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UGBC Hosts First Major And Minor Fair For The Undecided

For The Heights

Published: Wednesday, October 17, 2012

Updated: Wednesday, January 9, 2013 18:01

major

Eun Hee Kwon / Heights Staff

Over 40 areas of study were represented at the first-ever Major and Minor Fair held on Tuesday afternoon. The event was organized by the UGBC in collaboration with the Academic Advising Center as part of the inaugural Academic Advising Week.

Tables at the fair featured faculty and student representatives from the various fields of study within Arts and Sciences, as well as representatives from the Carroll School, the Lynch School, and the Connell School, for students considering switching schools within the University. The Academic Advising Center and Career Center were also on hand.

“The purpose of the Major/Minor Fair is to represent all the academic departments here at BC in one place, so that students can more easily utilize their resources,” said Sam Sklar, coordinator of academic advising for UGBC and LSOE ’14.

Students who attended the fair had the opportunity to explore the various majors and minors offered at Boston College. What distinguished the event was the opportunity to engage in personal interaction with the students and faculty on hand.

“I think the most valuable part of the fair was having the opportunity to actually speak with a person about the various fields of study, as opposed to just trying to figure it out yourself by looking at a website,” said Wooyoung Choi, A&S ’16.

BC’s core curriculum, which varies depending on the school, provides an opportunity for students to explore new areas of potential interest that they likely have not been exposed to in an in-depth manner. Many students find in fulfilling their core requirements that they actually discover a new or additional major or minor.

“I always encourage students to ‘take the best at their best,’ to do their research, ask around, find the best professors, and take the class they teach the best. This allows students to see a subject in a new light and potentially study it further,” said Boyd Taylor Coolman, a professor representing the theology department.

Many students who came to BC with a specific major in mind often end up switching majors once exposed to different courses through the University’s core curriculum.

“I actually came to Boston College as a math major, and ended up taking a microeconomics course as a part of my core classes,” said Lucas Hardy, A&S ’13, who was representing the economics table. “I enjoyed the class so much, and found it so relevant to my life that I decided to pursue an economics major instead.”

For students seeking to potentially switch majors or add an additional major or minor, the first step is to engage in conversation with an academic advisor.

“Students should come to the department they are potentially interested in to begin the initial conversation with the advisor. It is important to have a clear idea of what courses will be required for a major or minor before you get started,” Coolman said.

The Major/Minor Fair is part of a larger effort by the UGBC to improve the quality and communication surrounding students and academic advising. This particular event was a component of the platform of UGBC President and Vice President Chris Osnato and Kudzai Taziva, both A&S ’13, when campaigning last year.

The event was organized to provide clarity for many students feeling potentially overwhelmed by the process of selecting what to study.

“We are hoping for students to leave the fair feeling less lost and confused about the advising process and declaring a major. We understand that finding the right major for you cannot be solved in one—or even three—events dedicated to these topics. However, we hope this starts conversations and creates connections for students to further continue their search,” said Kara Naccarelli, coordinator of academic advising for UGBC and A&S ’14.

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